Advance Directives

About Advance Directives

Advance Directives are written guidance to your family, loved ones, and healthcare providers about your values and wishes concerning future health care choices. Called “advance” because it is prepared prior to a health crisis in which it would guide medical care. They are intended to help you think through your priorities and to have “the conversation” with those who are close.

About Surrogates

An Advance Directive includes a person’s living will (specifications for end-of-life care) and also allows you to identify a surrogate healthcare decision-maker who can represent your wishes should you become incapacitated and designate your primary physician. Advance directives vary by state and can include other documents, such as a dementia provision. State-specific advance directives make clear your end-of-life preferences if you are unable to make or communicate medical treatment decisions yourself.s

Living Will

A living will is a document that expresses a person’s end-of-life preferences if they become unable to speak for themselves. A living will is just one component of an advance directive.

New Mexico Advance Directive

Advance care planning is a process, not an event, and is planning for future care based on a person’s values, beliefs, preferences, and specific medical issues. An advance directive is the record of that process. It is both an umbrella term for defining and expressing how one wants to live and be treated and for state approved advance directive documents which allow you to specify those things and to appoint a person (healthcare durable power of attorney) to speak when you are unable to speak for yourself. 

You have the right to give instructions about your own health care. You also have the right to name someone else to make health-care decisions for you. This Optional Advance Health Care Directive (1-24) lets you do either or both of these things. It also lets you express your wishes regarding the designation of your primary physician.

You have the right to revoke your advance healthcare directive or replace the form at any time.

University of New Mexico Health Science Center, Institute for Ethics

Click here for their Values History Form and see the dual language (English/Spanish) version below. It is important that your medical treatment be your choice. The purpose of this form is to assist you in thinking about and writing down what is important to you about your health.

In the state of New Mexico, you are legally entitled to state your preferences for treatment in advance in case a time comes when you are no longer able to make those decisions for yourself. You also have a right to choose a person to make those decisions for you. If you do not appoint someone, the law provides that an appropriate relative or friend in a special relationship with you can make health care decisions on your behalf. 

Click here for the Optional Advance Health Care Directive form (1-24).

My End-of-Life Decisions: An Advance Planning Guide and Toolkit

Learn more at Compassion and Choices or download this FREE End of Life Planning Guide.

Like many people, you may have put off making decisions about your end-of-life care. Thinking and talking about end-of-life issues can be difficult, and putting documents in place can seem daunting.  This guide will help you think through your priorities for end-of-life care, complete an advance directive and other forms you may need, choose a representative to speak for you if you cannot, and consider common end-of-life medical interventions so you can specify what you want or don’t want — right up to the end. And it will guide you in having valuable conversations with your healthcare providers and loved ones.

Prepare for your care

Learn more at Compassion & Choices’  PREPARE for your care

PREPARE is a program to help you make medical decisions for yourself and others. This online tool is easy to use and and walks you through a five step advance care planning process that helps you to:

  1. Choose a medical decision maker.
  2. Decide what matters most in life.
  3. Choose flexibility for your decision maker.
  4. Tell others about your medical wishes.
  5. Ask doctors the right questions.

Use their tools to have a voice in your own medical care or to help other people with their medical planning and decisions. The website is offered in English and Spanish (click Español in the upper right corner of the home page).

NM-Statutory-Adv-Dir-Form
PDF For download. 7 pgs. (1-24)

Optional Advance Health Care Directive

Advance care planning is a process, not an event, and is planning for future care based on a person’s values, beliefs, preferences, and specific medical issues. An advance directive is the record of that process. Advance directives convey in writing a person’s choices regarding:

  1. who will be their health care decision maker in the event that they are unable to make these decisions and define the scope of their authority;
  2. give instructions for their health care; and
  3. designate their healthcare provider.  

They are legal documents governed by New Mexico state statute. Download and complete this form: Optional Advance Health Care Directive (1-24) to satisfy the requirements of New Mexico law for health care directives. 

Values-history-cover
PDF For download. 14 pgs.

University of New Mexico Health Science Center, Institute for Ethics

It is important that your medical treatment be your choice. The purpose of this form is to assist you in thinking about and writing down what is important to you about your health.

In New Mexico, you are legally entitled to state your preferences for treatment in advance in case a time comes when you are no longer able to make those decisions for yourself. You also have a right to choose a person to make those decisions for you. If you do not appoint someone, the law provides that an appropriate relative or friend in a special relationship with you can make health care decisions on your behalf. 

end-of-life-decisions-cover
PDF For download. 36 pgs.

My End-of-Life Decisions: An Advance Planning Guide and Toolkit

Learn more at Compassion and Choices

Like many people, you may have put off making decisions about your end-of-life care. Thinking and talking about end-of-life issues can be difficult, and putting documents in place can seem daunting. This advance planning guide will help you think through your priorities for end-of-life care, complete an advance directive and other forms you may need, choose a representative to speak for you if you cannot, and consider common end-of-life medical interventions so you can specify what you want or don’t want — right up to the end. And it will guide you in having valuable conversations with your healthcare providers and loved ones. Click below to download, or order your own hard copy of this excellent planning toolkit to be mailed to you here: https://secure.everyaction.com/2Mgxn1BeaUG3Q11VbeD30A2

RESOURCES:

Compassion and Choices

Try their free End of Life Planning Guide to help you think through your priorities for end of life care, complete an advance directive and other forms you may need, choose a representative to speak for you if you cannot, and consider common end of life medical interventions so you can specify what you want or don’t want – right up to the end. And, it will guide you in having valuable conversations with your healthcare providers and loved ones.

AARP

AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that empowers people to choose how they live as they age.
Planning for your future healthcare is important to make sure you get the medical care you want if you become unable to speak for yourself. To do this, have a conversation with your doctor or healthcare provider. Make sure to talk about your health, possible outcomes, and treatment options. Then, ask your doctor or provider to complete the New Mexico Medical Orders for Scope of Treatment (MOST) form based on your choices made during that conversation. You and your doctor or provider need to sign and date the form. The NM MOST form is a legal document that goes into effect only if you become incapacitated and are unable to speak for yourself. It helps others know what type of medical care you want.